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What nudist clubs/resorts will accept a married person without a spouse?

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  • What nudist clubs/resorts will accept a married person without a spouse?

    My nude time is mostly away from home when I hike or fish. There are several places in the north Georgia forests to get nude.

    Two summers ago I driving thru the Tampa area on my way to south Florida. I was able to tour the Lake Como Club and then stay for the afternoon. I let them know I was married , they weren't concerned.

    So I was wondering if any of the nudist clubs near Atlanta or anywhere in the U.S. would do the same?

  • #2
    I have visited clubs throughout TX, FL, and KS. Everyone I have visited would welcome you without question. Based on my research, unless the club has a policy limiting your type of visit, they would welcome you. Best advice is to call ahead if they don't know you regardless of how many will be in the party.

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    • #3
      I did visit Serendipity Park alone -some eight years ago - without my wife. BUT - I was an AANR member and a TNS member - both my wife's name and mine were on my card(s) -- and I knew one of the park operators; and I called the prior day and asked. My wife even offered to speak with them to give me permission to go, but they said "Nah, we know you, come on over."

      So even though I was admitted as a married man without his spouse - I'm not sure if I was an exception or not... check with any park before visiting.

      Also note that many nudist parks' gate policies can change - and they do - often at the drop of a hat. Some are explicit ("we try to maintain a gender balance - singles call ahead") some are vague, some are explicit in the other direction.

      ALWAYS CALL AHEAD, BEFORE VISITING. This allows the club to find out what you expect to find, and also prepare for your arrival.

      Even as a married couple, we'd always call ahead.
      Last edited by usuallylurk; 02-06-2015, 12:35 AM.

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      • #4
        I live in Southern California and have visited any club that is willing to take my money. I was a regular at Desert Sun in Palm Springs until they changed to couples only. Glen Eden has always discriminated against single males. Olive Dell has had a welcoming policy, but does try to stay somewhat gender balanced. De Anza is always welcoming too. I find that having a AANR card tends to open doors for the single visitor. Yes, they are more interested in supporting clubs than jumping in to support nude beaches or free hiking, but having the card makes you respectable in the eyes of the resort. I have also had good luck when traveling. If you are willing to rent a room or a cabin or a campsite and stay a couple of days, the resort is more welcoming to the single male.

        It comes down to this. I am a happily married man, whose wife is reluctant to participate in nude recreation. I am a mid-fifties professional with plenty of disposable income. I choose to give my money to resorts that are welcoming to all people, male or female, who enjoy nude recreation. If a resort is thriving being restrictive about who they allow in, then more power to them. But, if a resort would like to increase membership and occupancy, then openly welcome single males and males without spouses. I am not at a resort to pick up on women. Again, " happily married"! I would much rather hang out with a bunch of like minded males who just enjoy being naked.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by hikenaked View Post
          If a resort is thriving being restrictive about who they allow in, then more power to them. But, if a resort would like to increase membership and occupancy, then openly welcome single males and males without spouses.
          Some resorts and clubs aren't in it merely for the money. You will find these restrictions to be somewhat common at cooperatively-held clubs. You mentioned Glen Eden. It's a legacy co-op nudist park, and there are other legacy co-ops around the United States that have varying gate policies.

          Those of us in the scene have taken note that there are more restrictions found at cooperatively held clubs..

          It's comparable to a country club that restricts membership. If the club is owned by its members, it is run by its members, for the pleasure and convenience of its members, as those member/owners see fit. They own it - they make the rules. And to make a brash statement - they're in it for themselves. I've said this before, but sometimes there are legal reasons as to why they won't open the doors to married individuals without their spouses - and more likely, their reasons are social. They don't want to become a retreat FROM the family or spouse.

          It's their money, their right, it's a private group. Just as the folks at a certain Maine nudist park do not welcome women, but we rarely hear a complaint about that. There are gay-male oriented groups here in Massachusetts, and they're not known to be welcoming to "outsiders" (women, m/f couples)... so be it. Live and let live, but don't condemn me or mrs lurk from belonging to Cedar Waters, or visiting a club that may have restrictions in place on singles or "those who have non-participating spouses" (what we used to call "married singles".)

          I guess if the only nudist group or park within 200-300 miles of me restricted me, I'd be upset. For those that don't fall into that predicament, individuals (like hikenaked) have a choice as to where to spend your money.

          And yes, if you hold AANR membership - especially through a club - it tends to open doors. Holding it through a club means "you've (probably) been screened" - interviewed, and that club's certifying officer has put his/her signature down and vouched for you. TNS membership also opens doors.

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          • #6
            I don't think I ever said that "they were in it for themselves". In fact I said that if they want to be restrictive, "more power to them". There are too many out there that believe they are the legacy of nude recreation and assume everyone else is in it for nefarious reasons. Rather not hang out with those people anyway.

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            • #7
              I moved to the Orlando area 20 yrs ago. Soon after I visited the local resort to register as a day guest alone. They gave me a questionnaire to fill out. One question asked if I had prior nudist experience and I said yes. I identified that I had visited a resort in So Fla as well as Haulover Beach. It asked if I was registering as a single guest or married. Although my wife was not with me at the time, I said married, thinking that would guarantee my acceptance. After completing the registration, I was approved. Easy as that

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              • #8
                Originally posted by hikenaked View Post
                I don't think I ever said that "they were in it for themselves". In fact I said that if they want to be restrictive, "more power to them". There are too many out there that believe they are the legacy of nude recreation and assume everyone else is in it for nefarious reasons. Rather not hang out with those people anyway.

                No, you never said that. I did.

                When you say "legacy" - clubs like Pine Tree, Solair, Glen Eden, Mountain Air, Sky Farm, Rock Lodge -- they ARE the legacy clubs, as some of them go back to the 1930s or even earlier.

                In fact, one might argue (I won't - but just raising the point) that the "openness" of nudism, that has emerged since the 1980s - many parks and clubs now having open admissions - may have actually HURT the growth of organized nudism!

                I don't agree with that - I point toward AANR's rechartering , which kept its unwieldy myriad of sub-organizations (various boards, regional operations, and so forth) intact, preventing its own evolution into the 21st century.

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