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Sunscreen Claims - Be Cautious

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  • Sunscreen Claims - Be Cautious

    Interesting article about sunscreen effectiveness. Thought this was especially useful for this crowd...


    http://www.nydailynews.com/life-styl...icle-1.2223723

  • #2
    They not only don't meet their claims for protection factor, my experience has been that within just a few minutes of being active the perspiration has diluted them even more. My last venture was while kayaking and having what I had applied to my balding head and face run into my eyes and blinding me for all practical purposes. We were on the water about two hours and it took that long to regain my sight.

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    • #3
      Been there too....yooper. Definitely not a pleasant experience. I am fortunate that I am a good tanner and not a burner but I have had my share of severe sunburn while growing up in FL back in the 70s when sunscreen was more of a marketing concept, vice a viable product. The copper tone girl had nothing compared to my tan line! It was a pair of shorts and maybe shoes once school was out and I was outside all the time. But the beach did tear me up a few times, especially early before I had a good base going.

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      • #4
        The problem with sunscreens isn't the SPF ratings - most everyone except albino vampires (or people with a genuine condition that prohibits UV exposure) really don't need more than SPF15 (as long as it contains full UV-A and UV-B protection) - and most sunscreens are SPF 30 or higher. The problem with sunscreens is incomplete coverage, wearing off while still in the sun (not reapplied often enough) and the toxic chemicals they contain. Despite Consumers Reports claims, the natural products containing zinc and titanium oxide can be effective and non-toxic when used properly and reapplied often enough.

        You can make your own sunscreen (but Consumers Reports wouldn't approve): http://bit.ly/1PWvgwc
        Last edited by Naturist Mark; 06-09-2015, 07:19 PM.

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        • #5
          I sometimes wonder if the increase in skin cancer is really from sun exposure. It's increasing even though sunscreen use and SPF is increasing too. Could it really be the toxic chemicals we are spraying on our skin? Could it be that the chemicals they use are reacting with other chemicals we get exposed to every day? Are we going to read an article someday that says "sunscreens cause cancer"? I mean, look at the latest headlines; Salt does not cause high blood pressure anymore, dietary cholesterol has no effect on blood cholesterol, alcohol is good for you, and Americans have chronic Vitamin D deficiency. I wonder why? Funny, one of the things Vitamin D helps prevent is skin cancer!

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          • #6
            Great point Evernude. It's amazing how many chemicals companies try to load into/onto your body. My advice to anyone is to consume as many truly organic products as possible, including topical creams, etc. We made a drastic change about 3 months ago and I feel significantly better...not to mention lighter. It's funny but when you stop eating chemicals, your bodies natural "full" switch comes on right on schedule when you have eaten enough.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Evernude View Post
              I sometimes wonder if the increase in skin cancer is really from sun exposure. It's increasing even though sunscreen use and SPF is increasing too. Could it really be the toxic chemicals we are spraying on our skin? Could it be that the chemicals they use are reacting with other chemicals we get exposed to every day? Are we going to read an article someday that says "sunscreens cause cancer"? I mean, look at the latest headlines; Salt does not cause high blood pressure anymore, dietary cholesterol has no effect on blood cholesterol, alcohol is good for you, and Americans have chronic Vitamin D deficiency. I wonder why? Funny, one of the things Vitamin D helps prevent is skin cancer!
              There are a lot of articles saying sunscreens cause cancer, and in fact the increase in melanoma rates almost perfectly mimics the increased use of sunscreens - you should be cautioned that correlation does not equal causation, but it is clear that sunscreens are not preventing melanoma - the most serious and deadly form of skin cancers. Here is a particularly alarming article indicting sunscreens: New study shows many sunscreens are accelerating not preventing cancer but I'd take it's statements with a grain or three of salt, there may be plenty of truth there, but it is not from highly credible unbiased source.

              A study published in a peer-reviewed medical journal is far more authoritative - and even without the wild and breathless accusations does question the usefulness and safety of sunscreens in cancer prevention. Sunscreen and Melanoma: Is Our Prevention Message Correct?

              My takeaway - it is most important to avoid sunburns, but not sun exposure which is beneficial. If you need to stay in the sun use a broad spectrum sunscreen containing titanium dioxide and without retinols (vitamin A and its derivatives). Get enough non-burning sun exposure to develop your own vitamin D, and if you can't do that take vitamin D supplements - using only the D3 formulas- vitamin D2 is not effective.

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              • #8
                Great post Naturist Mark. I've read that people who spend a lot of time in the sun, but don't burn, actually have fewer melanomas that people who are out infrequently and burn themselves when they do. So, there is some truth to the "base tan" idea. Spend short periods sunbathing nude to develop a protective tan without allowing the skin to burn. After all, that is why our skin darkens. The Vitamin D is also essential to prevent skin, and other cancers. I believe it's the repeated burning, lack of Vitamin D, and possible chemical exposure that is driving the increase in skin cancer. We've been covering up too long and need to go back to the native ways!

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                • #9
                  I have typical concerns about the dangers of sun exposure living in Florida. My skin has a larger than normal amount of melanin and tan fairly easily without burning. One thing I do each year is to visit a dermatologist for a full body scan to determine skin damage. Despite the amount of time I spend in the sun, surprisingly my skin is nearly damage free. My trouble spot is my shoulders. I use sunscreen with any substantial time in the sun. The only time that I do not use sunscreen is when laying out by my pool which has a screen enclosure. This enclosure itself blocks out about 50% of the rays. My dermatologist recommends Neutrogena Beach Defense, water and sun SPF 70. It is a broad spectrum product which protects from UVA and UVB rays. Works for me.

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                  • #10
                    It amuses me that the dermatologists I've been to seem afraid of nudity! Three, so far, never asked me to remove all of it. I go to a new one in a few weeks, and I'm going to demand that he look at everything, even if his assistant has to leave the room (usually females). The only time I use sunscreen is for long days at the beach, which doesn't happen often unfortunately. I figure infrequent exposure to the toxic chemicals is better than one really bad sunburn every few months. It takes a lot of sun for me to burn, but all day at the beach is far too much without protection. I should look into a light weight umbrella setup that I can haul down the Pirate's Cove trail.

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                    • #11
                      Lately, we have been taking plain coconut oil you would normally use for cooking and using it as sunscreen. It has a natural SPF of about 4(?), not high but definitely better than nothing if you will be out in extended sun. Cost is significantly lower and it feels great on your skin.

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