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The bride wore nothing! Nude weddings may be legalised in rethink of marriage laws

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  • The bride wore nothing! Nude weddings may be legalised in rethink of marriage laws

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...l#ixzz3OgcjRKn
    And the bride wore... nothing! Nude weddings may be legalised in rethink of marriage laws that could also allow couples to marry in their own home

    • A wedding law review is to start this week ordered by ministers
    • Paper published by Justice Secretary Chris Grayling said naturists could qualify to conduct weddings if rules were changed
    • Reforms could also allow people to get married jumping out of aeroplanes
    By Steve Doughty for the Daily Mail
    Published: 20:34 EST, 12 January 2015 | Updated: 22:31 EST, 12 January 2015

  • #2
    At the moment wedding law allows couples to have a traditional wedding in church, under rules set by the Church of England and other churches with the right to conduct the ceremonies, or a civil wedding in a register office or ‘approved premises’.
    Approved premises, which include stately homes, hotels and sports ground entertainment suites, have proved highly popular since they were introduced in the 1990s.
    Only Jews and Quakers are allowed to marry in their own homes, under laws from 1753 which released them from the requirement to be married by the Church of England.
    Any country as old as England, with a close relationship between the government and official church, is bound to have some odd laws.

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    • #3
      An odd thing, jasenj, about weddings. You'll notice that there are still a lot of "little countries" in Europe, which are essentially "city states" - or "tiny countries" Andorra, Lichtenstein, Vatican, Gibraltar, Malta, San Marino, I guess Luxembourg is close to that status. You can make a judgement as to whether Denmark, and three Baltic states fall into that but that's a whole other topic.

      I call out one = Monaco. This is a country that is probably > 90 percent Roman Catholic. Its marriage laws state that any religious marriage ceremony performed in the country is not valid under the law.

      There also has to be a civil, legal ceremony. When Grace Kelly married Rainier Grimaldi (Price Rainier and Princess Grace) - they had a glamorous church wedding - immediately after leaving their legal civil ceremony which was performed in the throne room. The same happened with Prince Albert and Princess Charlene. Civil first, religious second.

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      • #4
        A church ceremony is not a legal wedding in some of the bigger countries, too. Our legal wedding in Germany was officiated by the Burgermeister in the city administration building and witnessed by a couple of friends. We didn't opt for a church wedding. Still married after more than 30 years.

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