Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Barefoot socierty

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Barefoot socierty

    Being from a medical background,I have seen many problems that actually arise from our tendency to always wear shoes and socks.I think we must start a society where we must propogate kids brought up as barefooters(and obviousely nude as well),but to the point.Kids need to grow up shoeless,and start living barefoot all their days in summer and wherever wheather permits it.People use all types of excuses,athletes foot...well,thats because youre always wearing shoes,your feet perspire and cause the ideal breeding ground for fungus...darkness,heat,food,and a ph- equalibrium of 6-7.
    Why parents must always force their kids into wearing shoes drives me stupid.Why must kids wear shoes to school anyway,and whats so bad about living barefoot any way...?Kids love playing,and the less restricted,the better!Walking barefoot,and raising your kids barefoot is one of the healthiest things you can offer your child.
    sneakers nearly always makes your feet stink and sweat....tight fitting shoes causes bunnions due to the unnatural presure applied to your foot bone structure.
    Many people use the excuse that their feetare to soft and tender,well,after walking barefoot for at least two weeks,your feet already toughen up.Okay,some cannot go to work barefoot,but why should kids wear shoes to school when they play and have fun.I can understand if you work in a high risk zone,eg. construction buisiness,metal workshops,then shoes are safe,but why in non high risk places.
    people also use the excuse of thorns and splinters and glass,well,you can look where you walk,cant you?
    Worms and parrascites...not all that frequent,only if you live in areas where there is open faeces,corpses etc.Worms are mostly ingested.,and not all that often absorbed.
    We should realy let our kids be kids....barefoot,like kids aught to be,and naked,naturally.Nothing is as cute as a barefoot kid!
    Attached Files

  • #2
    I was barefoot most summers growing up, and I still have foot problems. I went barefoot at home until recently. Some foot problems are due to heredity. Bunions are an example. They are mostly caused by poor biomechanics, and genetics. Footwear is only a small factor in many people.

    Comment


    • #3
      Bernardc there's a barefooters website out there someplace, although i don't think it's been updated for years.
      By the way i'm a barefooter and love it. My Kids never wear shoes unless They need to...drives my Wife mad!

      Comment


      • #4
        Love to be barefooted! Growing up we were always barefooted and had soles tough enough to run across rocks!

        I am still barefooted most of the time but I also wear very comfortable shoes with good shoebeds. I avoid any shoes that do not allow for toes to wiggle freely and do not support the foot.

        Comment


        • #5
          My personal compromise are my Birkenstock sandles which provide great arch and foot support as well as protection.

          Comment


          • #6
            Shoe-less

            When I was a child, I was barefoot during the summer. I lived in the city. When crossing the street, the asphalt was very hot to walk on when crossing a street, so I hurried across the street. Many times the cement of the sidewalk was very hot, so I walked on the grass beside the sidewalk, as much as possible.

            Now, summer or winter, the first thing I do when entering my house is to take off my shoes. I certainly welcome others who leave their shoes by the door when they enter my home. Much of my flooring is grey/white, so it stays clean much longer when everyone takes off their shoes. It is more sanitary too.

            I understand that the Japanese leave their shoes beside the door before they enter a home. I wish that were the custom here.

            Comment


            • #7
              We tend to leave our shoes by the door in many parts of Canada. Heck, in this town, there are signs in public buildings, including the hospital, asking you to remove your shoes. I thought that was a little anal until I experienced my first winter and spring here......it is actually very sensible!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by David77 View Post
                When I was a child, I was barefoot during the summer. I lived in the city. When crossing the street, the asphalt was very hot to walk on when crossing a street, so I hurried across the street. Many times the cement of the sidewalk was very hot, so I walked on the grass beside the sidewalk, as much as possible.
                I was much like you, except that I refused to walk on the grass. Where I grew up the temperature in the summer would frequently reach 110 degrees and I still wouldn't walk on the grass. I would sometimes walk 2 or 3 blocks barefoot, on the asphalt, and the only problem I had was a bit of redness. The pain would go away after about 30 steps.

                I still do stuff like that on occasion. I like to test my physical limits on occasion just to see how far I can go before I break.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I was always barefoot as a child. In fact, I went about barefoot so much that the soles of my feet were tough. On hot summer days where the tar in the road was starting turn into liquid, I could walk on it without an ounce of pain, only to pull off the dried tar from my feet. Not that I could do that any more.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    On the TV program, This Old House, it shows that it is fashionable and sensible in the states up north to have what they call a "Mud Room" at the back entrance of their house, so that the children and adults can take off their shoes and over-shoes when coming in from the rain and snow.

                    This TV program never mentions what they do after they take their shoes off - go barefoot mostly? At least, I certainly think that they also take their soxs off for comfort, if their sox get wet.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Societal Acceptance

                      Good topic Bernard,

                      My son and I are barefoot at home all the time. It just that living in the USA
                      one has to conform to societal norms when out in public. In California it is in the Education Code that all public school students wear close toed footwear.

                      Most stores and restaurants have posted signs requiring shirts and footwear.
                      Although a few months ago I spotted a youngish family of barefooters in a supermarket. Looked like older siblings 20ish and younger teen brothers.
                      I wanted to say right on to their bold unabashedness.

                      I got to wondering if there are coastal communities where one can frolic
                      barefoot without someone passing judgement. Where barefoot is an acceptable norm.

                      Around here people would look at you as a bum or white trash if you were walking in town barefoot.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I too, perfer to be barefoot as much as possible. I do not hesitate to walk outside in the summer on the hot concrete of the driveway when it is 112 outside. But lately I have had to start wearing some type of shoes because it is too painful to be barefooted. I guess because I have been on my feet for 12 hours a day in the restaurant for the last 26 years they are starting to just wear out. I still go barefoot as much as possible but I find it is more comfortable to wear sandles or good thongs for the support. Still, there is nothing like being barefoot in the grass...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          A lot of houses in this area will have a mud room, especially in the rural areas. This is a room where you can hang your coats and leave your footwear. It might also provide storage and washer and dryer. If we build a house, we will make sure it has one.

                          We leave our socks on when we remove our boots here. There is a dance step for avoiding puddles that most of have learned. Of course, puddles cannot always be avoided.....I got one with each foot on my way out of work yesterday. :o

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I'm a semi-part-time barefooter. I'll go barefoot at home or the beach, but prefer shoes everywhere else. During the summer, I'll wear sandals, but I prefer the style of sneakers.

                            One thing I have noticed is that women tend to go barefoot more often than men, regardless of other clothing preferences. In fact, in junior high we had a Spanish texbook that featured a picture of a guy in loafers without socks. A friend of mine pointed to him and said "Gay."

                            So, does society associate barefootedness with femininity, while guys are supposed to wear steel-toed boots or wing-tips 24/7?
                            Last edited by polutropon; 02-11-2009, 09:34 AM. Reason: originally omitted word "else"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              polutropon, to my knowledge being barefooted is not gender related and I have found nothing in readings to refer to such. I think it is just a preference of those who enjoy barefooting versus those who don't. Some people have very tender feet, others don't. I also think it has a lot to do with how you were raised.

                              I was raised going barefooted. My whole family did in the summers. I think this is where it begins.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X