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Japanese man recites pi from memory to 100,000 decimal places

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  • Japanese man recites pi from memory to 100,000 decimal places

    Japanese man recites pi from memory to 100,000 decimal places

    A Japanese mental health counsellor recited pi to 100,000 decimal places from memory Wednesday, setting what he claims is a world record.

    Akira Haraguchi, 60, needed more than 16 hours to recite the number to 100,000 decimal places, breaking his personal best of 83,431 digits set in 1995, his office said Wednesday. He made the attempt at a public hall in Kisarazu, just east of Tokyo.

    Read the rest here...
    Dang! And I can hardly remember a phone number for the time it takes to dial it.

  • #2
    Japanese man recites pi from memory to 100,000 decimal places

    quote:

    A Japanese mental health counsellor recited pi to 100,000 decimal places from memory Wednesday, setting what he claims is a world record.

    Akira Haraguchi, 60, needed more than 16 hours to recite the number to 100,000 decimal places, breaking his personal best of 83,431 digits set in 1995, his office said Wednesday. He made the attempt at a public hall in Kisarazu, just east of Tokyo.

    Read the rest here...


    Dang! And I can hardly remember a phone number for the time it takes to dial it.

    Comment


    • #3
      I would say it's time for him to get a life.

      Comment


      • #4
        That is amazing! I wonder how long he has been studying and practicing for this?

        And I don't know about pi commonly being stopped at 3.141. That isn't good rounding because the next digit is 5 and that isn't a good place to stop either, as the next digit is 9. I have no idea what comes next. I thought it was usually written as 3.14, or the long version 3.14159.

        And as for using a supercomputer to calculate pi to more than 1 trillion places, you would need the supercomputer just to count that many places.

        Try putting those on a bumper sticker!

        Comment


        • #5
          A Japanese man recites pi from memory to 100,000 decimal places from memory

          With all due respect hairyballs, the guy doesn't need to get a life. He needs a cheap shrink!

          Hey nacktman, are you available to make a house call?

          Comment


          • #6
            quote:
            Originally posted by nifocinphx:
            A Japanese man recites pi from memory to 100,000 decimal places from memory

            With all due respect hairyballs, the guy doesn't need to get a life. He needs a cheap shrink!



            According to the article, the Japanese man is a "mental health counsellor". Who knows, maybe memorizing long lists of numbers actually helps some people with mental health issues by giving their minds a focus.

            Comment


            • #7
              Maybe I had better start memorizing pi. What comes after 3.14?

              Comment


              • #8
                While it may be a pretty useless mental task, it is an amazing mental feat!

                Comment


                • #9
                  What we must do is clear. Find as many other people with the same memorization capabilities as this man, join them together* in a high-performance organic computing cluster, and give them the task of computing ? to as many significant digits as we can possibly get.

                  *How, I have no earthly idea.



                  UW

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    So, who sat there for 16 hours to verify that this guy wasn't simply reciting random numbers?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      quote:
                      Originally posted by Red Baron:
                      So, who sat there for 16 hours to verify that this guy wasn't simply reciting random numbers?

                      from hm0504's Read the rest here... link -
                      quote:
                      ... all of Haraguchi's activities during the attempt, including his bathroom breaks, were video taped for evidence that will later be sent for verification by the Guinness Book of Records.

                      Two local education officials joined 29 conference hall staff who worked in rotation to monitor Haraguchi.

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