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American Veteran's Day is Sunday

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  • American Veteran's Day is Sunday

    This Sunday is Veteran's Day here in the good ole U S of A. So, on Sunday morning after eating my pancakes and drinking my OJ I will put out Old Glory and give a thanks for all the service men and women who died to protect my freedoms.

    Also good to think that this is the 25th anniversary of the Vietnam War Memorial. It is a place that every American should visit.

  • #2
    Originally posted by BinCo View Post
    This Sunday is Veteran's Day here in the good ole U S of A. So, on Sunday morning after eating my pancakes and drinking my OJ I will put out Old Glory and give a thanks for all the service men and women who died to protect my freedoms.

    Also good to think that this is the 25th anniversary of the Vietnam War Memorial. It is a place that every American should visit.
    Actually, BinCo, we veterans would prefer you'd remember all of us - living and dead on Veteran's Day ... Memorial Day is for remembering those who have died to protect and defend us.

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    • #3
      Rememberence Day

      This is the Canadian way of acknowledging the contributions of our veterans in keeping our country safe and helping other countries.
      We attend the service every year.

      "We will remember them."

      Comment


      • #4
        I could not agree with you more!!!

        Not only do we veterans deserve the appropriate respect (i.e., a four star general who is a decorated war veteran rates more respect than a recruit who has just completed basic training), but our voices and our opinions on military matters deserve to be heard.

        Next time a life-long civilian expresses flawed opinions about our military, we owe it to our comrades-in-arms, as well as ourselves, to set the record straight.

        Also, the next time that a professional politician tries to win votes by talking about the alleged atrocities, which never really happened, we need to set the record straight and fight back with our voices and our votes.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Nu View Post
          This is the Canadian way of acknowledging the contributions of our veterans in keeping our country safe and helping other countries.
          We attend the service every year.

          "We will remember them."

          I just mentioned the importance of setting the record straight.

          "We will remember them."

          Veterans' Day, which falls on the same day as British Remembrance Day started on the anniversary of Armistace Day, which, for the most part, marked the end of the First World War. The date was the 11th day of the 11th month and the year was 1918.

          Back in 1984, while posted at NAS Bermuda, we participated in the Remembrance Day observances. We marched in the parade smartly attired in our service dress uniforms.

          Seeing the medals and ribbons worn by the Royal Navy, Bermuda Regiment, the Police and other uniformed personnel, I was awed at the sight of some of the old vets (or "ex-servicemen," which is what the British call their military veterans) wearing their full-sized medals on their civilian suit coats and blazers. Quite a few were quite old and wore campaign medals from WW2. (Regretfully, I don't remember if any WW1 medals were worn.)

          Next time any of you see a veteran wearing his medals or ribbon bars, take a moment and inquire. You might be be treated to a real story that has been excluded from history.

          While some so-called "politically-correct" arm-chair historians decide what to include in some long-winded book (which is better at treating insomnia than of informing students of what really happened), our real heroes (those who have really been there and made history) are dying. When they go, their chapter and often, the book is closed.

          The last time that I had the privelege of speaking with a World War 1 veteran was nearly 18 years ago. In the USA, there are only about three WW1 vets still living.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by BinCo View Post
            This Sunday is Veteran's Day here in the good ole U S of A. So, on Sunday morning after eating my pancakes and drinking my OJ I will put out Old Glory and give a thanks for all the service men and women who died to protect my freedoms.

            Also good to think that this is the 25th anniversary of the Vietnam War Memorial. It is a place that every American should visit.
            This is a bit late, but for the American veterans, we are now being encouraged to wear our decorations on civilian attire on patriotic holidays, such as Veterans' Day/Remembrance Day, Memorial Day and Independance Day.
            In addition to getting the regognition that we deserve, this is also an opportunity to show our patriotism and silently tell others that we served.
            On special patrotic occasions, our British comrades-in-arms, who have served in the military, wear their medals on their civilian clothes. Normally the medals are worn on the left side of their blazers.
            A word of warning to those who never served or simply want to get some undeserved recognition: do not wear any medal or ribbons that you don't rate. To do so is against the law and you could face misdemeanor charges. (This is another reason to keep your DD Form 214.)

            Comment


            • #7
              I will keep my politics out of this -- but --

              I am the father of a Bronze Star Medal winner -- my daughter served as a commissioned officer - combat signal engineer - in Operation Iraqi Freedom II (2004-2005).

              Thank you for reminding me to thank her (and her boyfriend who also is a Desert Storm and Iraqi Freedom veteran 1991 and 2005-2006).

              I will give her a call tomorrow.

              'lurk

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              • #8
                Originally posted by usuallylurk View Post
                I will keep my politics out of this -- but --

                I am the father of a Bronze Star Medal winner -- my daughter served as a commissioned officer - combat signal engineer - in Operation Iraqi Freedom II (2004-2005).

                Thank you for reminding me to thank her (and her boyfriend who also is a Desert Storm and Iraqi Freedom veteran 1991 and 2005-2006).

                I will give her a call tomorrow.

                'lurk
                No reason to keep your politics out of it, whether dead center, left or right. In fact, by saying you're keeping your politics out of it, suggests that you have some strong political feelings about it.

                Those who serve, and who have served, rarely do so out of political ideology...they serve because it is their job, and because their comrades count on them, and they want to stay alive in order to get back to the world. Politics (perhaps failed politics is more to the point in case of war) put them there, but, it is not politics that gets them to saddle up and soldier!

                Your daughter and her boyfriend will appreciate your call. That will be a great thing for you to do. This former Marine, son of a soldier, and father of a Marine, and descendant of many soldiers of many wars, who ardently opposes this occupation, appreciates, respects and honors their service and joins in the hopes of all parents, and people of goodwill, everywhere, that someday there are no veterans to honor!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by usmc1 View Post
                  ... that someday there are no veterans to honor!
                  True that!

                  Let us hope that, that Someday is soon for the sake of humanity.

                  This is one Marine who proudly served and honor all who have - but hopes for the day when the last veteran is forgotten because they are not needed, not because we are "too busy" to remember them.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    "The willingness with which our young people are likely to serve in any war, no matter how justified, shall be directly proportional as to how they perceive the Veterans of earlier wars were treated and appreciated by their country."
                    George Washington, 1789


                    Growing up in Canada in the 70s I remember every year around Rememberence Day all the school kids would meet in the gym for an assembly. There were vets who gave speeches and the final bit was always this poem.

                    In Flanders Fields

                    In Flanders fields the poppies blow
                    Between the crosses, row on row,
                    That mark our place; and in the sky
                    The larks, still bravely singing, fly
                    Scarce heard amid the guns below.

                    We are the Dead. Short days ago
                    We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
                    Loved, and were loved, and now we lie
                    In Flanders fields.

                    Take up our quarrel with the foe:
                    To you from failing hands we throw
                    The torch; be yours to hold it high.
                    If ye break faith with us who die
                    We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
                    In Flanders fields.

                    Canada also released a coin with a poppy on it in recognition to our vets a few years ago.



                    You might recall that the coin also produced a espionage warning by the US Department of Defence.

                    Little plastic poppies are also worn around this time in Canada to show our respect for our vets. Link

                    I'll end this with a comic I agree with...



                    Qikdraw

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                    • #11
                      ... Memorial Day is for remembering those who have died to protect and defend us. [/quote]

                      Why do folks get Memorial Day & Veterans Day confused?

                      To all who love their freedom everyday should be Vetrans Day. Whenever I meet someone and it comes up in conversation that they have served I never leave without saying "thanks for your service".

                      So, to all you guys & gals that have served - Well Done! & THANK YOU!

                      Chuck

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        True to that chuckincville.

                        I remember these days because my father and step-father both served Navy support in Vietnam. They both came home and cancer killed them some years later. They were 1st Lt in Navy. Nice guys. I miss them still.

                        I still believe every American should visit DC. Take in the sites, visit the museums, see Arlington and remember that you have the freedom to stand out in the middle of the Mall and yell to the top of your lungs how you feel about the state of things with no fear of being arrested and dragged away for possibly having an opinion that stands against the government because of the men and women buried there.

                        I look forward to a day without veterans, alas as long as religion is such a major part of humanity we will have veterans.

                        Thanks to all who served.

                        Enough said.

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