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  • Arthritis

    I have recently been diagnosed with arthritis in my right foot. It is in the base of the big toe joint, the first metatarsal phalangal joint. I thought I had a bunion, and x-rays showed otherwise. I went to the podiatrist, and he cast me for new orthotics. Apparently the ones I have encourage that joint to bend, which is not good. My new ones will be mailed from Vancouver on Tuesday, so I should have them soon. Yay.

    The podiatrist also suggested three other options, in addition to the orthotics. I have spoken to my GP about this, and he has made a recommendation. Here are the three options:
    • steroid injection to the joint. This will reduce the inflamation and not increase the range of motion. My GP has recommended this option and has given me a prescription. I am thinking about it, and if I fill the prescription I will go in and he will inject it.
    • "Durolane" injection. This is hyaluronic acid. We have this compound in our bodies already. This option is also called viscosupplementation. The podiatrist said it is like lubricating the joint. It is a very attractive option. The information I have gotten says that this is expensive, and that it may or may not work. It also only lasts for 4-6 months if it does work.
    • Surgery. I do not know what he had in mind since this would be my last choice.
    The information I have found on any of these options relates to knees and hips. When you check podiatry links, you will find that arthritis in the foot is quite common, yet I have found no information on this.

    I am interested in hearing other people's experiences. I am also interested in any links to information/research.

    At this point, I am inclined to try the steroid injection. If it helps the inflamation settle down, and ends this flare-up, I will be happy. I have a gibbled neck too, and once I got a flare-up settled two years ago, it has been much better, so I know relief can happen. I hope. :o

    Thanks for the ideas. I know there are many wise folks (not to mention wise-guys) in here, so I anticipate hearing good stuff!
    Last edited by Boreas; 10-12-2008, 03:57 PM.

  • #2
    Sorry to hear about your problem. I have a problem with my right foot but it is not nearly as serious as what you have. I have Planters (?) in my right heel and so far have not found much relief. I also have orthodics but they are probably 10 years old. A couple of months ago I could hardly walk as the pain was shooting up the back of my calf from the heel. I started taking Ibuforin (? sp) and it took care of the pain. I guess it is an anti-inflamatory.

    Is the injection you are thinking of a Cortisone shot? I have been told you can only have three of these injections during your lifetime. I hope you find relief soon.

    Comment


    • #3
      Sorry to hear about the foot, I know that foot pain is debilatating. I have a neuroma(sp), and plantar fashiotious(sp) in my right foot. If it is cortisone I have had many shots because of the neuroma, not just three, but it is another temperary fix. Do not know anything to help with arthritis except for anti-inflamatories.

      Comment


      • #4
        viscosuplementation

        i have had viscosuplimentation for crondomalacia patella of my right knee it worked for a while but due to my condition being degenrative it only lasted for 8 months but it worth a try ( i ended up needing surgury to by my time) i have avoided taking NSAID's as the gastric problems associated with them are quite bad. i take glucosamine (helps rebuild cartlidge) msm (natural anti inflamatory) and crodition (helps body make use of glocosamine better) it has helped alot i take it as apowder as tablets can pass through with out breaking down to get the full benifits they have done studies in australia on using green lipped muscles which have excellent anti inflamatory properties this may be worth discussing with your doctor

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks guys. I have had plantar fasciitis in my left heel and now there are bone spurs. Apparently there are bone spurs on both heels, but I only feel the left one. It is not a big deal because it is quiet if I wear orthotics or Birkenstocks. It was really bad at first, and is now down to a dull roar. I can handle dull. All, if you do some stretches of your achilles tendon (back of your heel) that ought to help. Also, I have found that taking ibuprofen (Advil) and acetaminophen (Tylenol) helps a lot. Apparently that has a better anti-inflamatory and pain killing effect. I use that combo, plus a OTC muscle relaxant to nail my neck if it starts grumbling.

          The shots are indeed cortisone shots. I am very skeptical about cortisone. At the same time, the fact that it is such a good anti-inflamatory and is site specific, I am willing to consider it. I would not consider taking steroids orally right now. I realized that my doctor has only prescribed steroids for me, a cream for skin and now this. I thought I was against that stuff! Oh well, it does have its place. My doctor said that sometimes the shot solves the problem permanently. I am not counting on that, but getting it down so I can take care of it is attractive. I guess wearing flat sandals to walk a couple of blocks is out. That is what triggered this one.

          Comment


          • #6
            Cortizone shots work for some people, and not others. It is worth trying. It didn't really work for my back, but others who have had back problems say it works great. So it just depends.

            I'm sorry to hear you are having these problems though. Does spending lots of time in a jaccuzi help?

            Comment


            • #7
              This sounds like a classic case of gout to me. Be sure that your doctor checks your uric acid level in your blood to see if you have gout.

              http://www.podiatrychannel.com/gout/index.shtml
              Last edited by David77; 10-12-2008, 08:04 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by David77 View Post
                This sounds like a classic case of gout to me. Be sure that your doctor checks your uric acid level in your blood to see if you have gout.

                http://www.podiatrychannel.com/gout/index.shtml
                I have seen a big toe with gout, and mine does not look like that. I have also seen my x-rays.....no cartilage. Good indication of OA. That is also what the radiologist said.

                Qikdraw, I may just consider the shots. I suppose it can't hurt. As long as my feet hurt, I will always remember my mother and grandmother......I have their genes!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Omega 3 Fish Oil

                  I would suggest taking Omega 3 Fish Oil supplements. I have had arthritis in my lower back since I was 17 and was taking Celebrex until the warnings came out. Took about two weeks until I noticed the difference, now I only take Motrin when I have to...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Aging is not for sissies!

                    OA is part of the deal, and except for extremely debilitating cases you will find that the best options are daily exercise (walking at least ten miles a week) and stretching, proper rest, maintaining the proper weight for you body type, and whatever OTC medicines give you relief.

                    Also, find and use a relaxtion/meditation techiniques or program that works for you. Join a support group.

                    It helps to have interest and activities outside yourself. The more active and involved one is the less one feels "pain".

                    You want to delay as long as you can surgeries and heavy duty medicines.

                    Mrs USMC suffers from OA, osteoporosis and degenerative disk disease and takes several different medicines and pain-killers as required. But she would be the first to tell that you should stay as active as you can. Daily exercise has helped her rebuild some bone density, for example.

                    USMC, who has a lifetime history of stupidity and overuse of his body, (leaping from the garage roof to entertain the other neighborhood kids, sports, the Marines, stupid old motorcycle) has some OA activity in various sites of his body, wears orthotics--and can predict rain with the best of them, practices what he preaches above and gets by quite well despite constant pain.

                    In my experience there is no cure for OA only palliative treatments and surgeries and meds, each with its own separate issue. That is why I preach the conservative approach whenever it is fitting.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      "I have seen a big toe with gout, and mine does not look like that. I have also seen my x-rays.....no cartilage. Good indication of OA. That is also what the radiologist said."

                      The appearance of gout can be visibly pronounced or invisable. I wouldn't dismiss anything yet. Simply move that thought to the "not likely pile". If it is gout, it will also respond to the steroids. The good thing about gout is that it is more treatable than other forms of arthritis.

                      Did the radiologist xray both feet to compare them for bone density, cartilage etc?

                      Good luck.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Boreas View Post
                        I have recently been diagnosed with arthritis in my right foot. It is in the base of the big toe joint, the first metatarsal phalangal joint. I thought I had a bunion, and x-rays showed otherwise. I went to the podiatrist, and he cast me for new orthotics. Apparently the ones I have encourage that joint to bend, which is not good. My new ones will be mailed from Vancouver on Tuesday, so I should have them soon. Yay.

                        The podiatrist also suggested three other options, in addition to the orthotics. I have spoken to my GP about this, and he has made a recommendation. Here are the three options:
                        • steroid injection to the joint. This will reduce the inflamation and not increase the range of motion. My GP has recommended this option and has given me a prescription. I am thinking about it, and if I fill the prescription I will go in and he will inject it.
                        • "Durolane" injection. This is hyaluronic acid. We have this compound in our bodies already. This option is also called viscosupplementation. The podiatrist said it is like lubricating the joint. It is a very attractive option. The information I have gotten says that this is expensive, and that it may or may not work. It also only lasts for 4-6 months if it does work.
                        • Surgery. I do not know what he had in mind since this would be my last choice.
                        The information I have found on any of these options relates to knees and hips. When you check podiatry links, you will find that arthritis in the foot is quite common, yet I have found no information on this.

                        I am interested in hearing other people's experiences. I am also interested in any links to information/research.

                        At this point, I am inclined to try the steroid injection. If it helps the inflamation settle down, and ends this flare-up, I will be happy. I have a gibbled neck too, and once I got a flare-up settled two years ago, it has been much better, so I know relief can happen. I hope. :o

                        Thanks for the ideas. I know there are many wise folks (not to mention wise-guys) in here, so I anticipate hearing good stuff!
                        Hi Boreas,

                        I'm sorry to hear about that. I would recommend speaking to your doctor about Celebrex. For many people it alleviates all of the pain and swelling.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by usmc1
                          In my experience there is no cure for OA only palliative treatments and surgeries and meds, each with its own separate issue. That is why I preach the conservative approach whenever it is fitting.
                          Thanks Mr and Mrs usmc. I fully agree with you. I am also blessed with the genetics that almost guarantees OA, and other bone related issues. I am with you on the activity, and am using this as a motivator to get moving again. The new orthotics will help as well. My current set encourage the forefoot to bend, which will aggravate the issue. The new ones will support the forefoot. Yoga is also very helpful. It has kept my neck tuned up well.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by paul1961
                            Did the radiologist xray both feet to compare them for bone density, cartilage etc?
                            Yes, both feet were x-rayed. The radiologist commented on both feet.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              If anyone finds an answer to this, I will be an eager reader! I suffer from recurrent accute and incapacitating joint pain. Usually feet, either ankle, either knee, at one period a hip and rarely an elbow. One joint at a time, but it moves around for no apparent reason. I have seen any number of doctors, rheumatologists and a physiotherapist and no-one has got anywhere near giving me a clear and unequivocal diagnosis of the cause and, more important, how to prevent and treat it. Xrays showed joints to be clear of bone deterioration, other than slight signs in one big toe. I have some lumps (known as tophi I think) on my feet around the toes and on an elbow, but these cause no discomfort.

                              I use prescription shoe orthotics, and made-to-order Birkenstocks that I wear a lot. And sometimes Copper-heelers, as copper is supposed to be good for joint pains and arthritis.

                              I suspect that my problem is gout related. For years I have had a tendency to high uric acid, and care with my diet does not seem to control this well. I used to get widely-spaced gout attacks, which would be worse at night but responded fairly rapidly to anti-inflammatories, such as Diclofenac. Both specialist and general doctors recommend Allopurinol as a preventive and to control uric acid. On the two occasions I have given this extended trials, I had more gout attacks than at any other period in my life - so no thanks! Oh..and no doctor bothered to tell me that you should stop taking Allopurinol if you do get a gout attack - I had to discover this from the internet.

                              My recent attacks, which have been much more frequent, do not seem the same. If the joint is kept completely still it does not hurt, whereas gout would hurt all the time. And they also do not respond to anti-inflammatories. In September I had pain in my right knee which went on for 9 days and made it extraordinarily painful to get in and out of bed, very difficult getting up and down stairs and I had to walk stiff-legged to avoid the knee collapsing under me. Driving was at times impractical. Following some research, I started taking Colchicine and have continued to take one a day as a preventive. Unfortunately this causes diarrhoea as a side effect but one per day seems manageable and have not had a new attack for a month, after having almost constant problems from late July until mid-September, during which time I was travelling just to add to the complications.

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