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  • Help stop Codex

    I thought that every nudist and just visitors should see this video..


    Video

    and visit Health Freedom USA

    Hi..If you care about your family and their health and your health then you should watch this video. I have never heard of Codex before but am glad someone posted this on a web site and I found it as it could change the way you look at food again. You will be shocked at what the government wants to do with our food. Please take the time to watch this..It could save your life..Cheers..NoodJuggler

    P.S. Send this to family and friends.

  • #2
    I thought that every nudist and just visitors should see this video..


    Video

    and visit Health Freedom USA

    Hi..If you care about your family and their health and your health then you should watch this video. I have never heard of Codex before but am glad someone posted this on a web site and I found it as it could change the way you look at food again. You will be shocked at what the government wants to do with our food. Please take the time to watch this..It could save your life..Cheers..NoodJuggler

    P.S. Send this to family and friends.

    Comment


    • #3
      Interesting, thanks for posting the link.

      Comment


      • #4
        March 18, 2007

        Comment


        • #5
          RED FLAG

          As in:

          "World Government"

          I suggest that before one makes a decision about this important issue regarding standards, regulations, labeling, pesticides and other food contaminents restrictions for the world's food supply that they do a bit of diggin'.

          We saw recently how quickly unregulated pet foods with contaniments from an international supply caused havoc in this country...imagine that on a human scale. Then factor in the peanut butter scare and various fast-food E-coli outbreaks and you can determine whether or not foods should have regulations and restrictions regarding their source, ingredients, preparation, factual labeling and the like.

          And just a suggestion, take a look at the origin of the food you just bought. You'll be amazed at how much of it has been imported from other countries with an American brand label glued on.

          Perhaps starting with this, maybe this Wiki entry would help you...

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Codex_Alimentarius

          And, this story about OTC "health" additives that don't measure up. Another reason for truth in labeling, regulations, testing and enforcement by (Big Brother).

          http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/18027830/

          Comment


          • #6
            The U.N. and its related agencies need to be severely reigned in. They should primarily be acting as advisory bodies, but they keep trying to extend their power in an attempt to be a world government.

            The U.S. needs to take a very hard line when the U.N. tries to enact rules or regulations that attempt to override our own laws and regulations.

            Comment


            • #7
              Hi all..People are going to be laid back and not care about this but everyone should be upset about this. Everything that you eat will be destroyed and of no value to eat. If they would just stop importing from other countries and start growing more at home or tell the other countries how we want it grown that would help. Myself I think that the problem with the spinach, peanut butter, dog food and other editable products were tainted on purpose so people will be more receptive to an organization who says they will take care of this problem. And welcome them with open arms. I agree that we need better control to make sure we get what we're suppose to get from the products we use everyday but Codex is not telling the complete story, any vitamin or mineral or anything not on their list will be illegal. Big business runs the world. Those who have the food controls the people and that is what they are doing in the USA. People need to wake up before it is to late..Cheers..NoodJuggler

              Comment


              • #8
                And there it is!

                A worldwide conspiracy to taint our food so the UN can impose one-world government--WAKE UP AMERICA, before it's too late!

                What's next, you don't think they'll want to flouridate our water, do you?

                Seriously, one line jumps out at me. That we should stop importing food and produce our own. What? no more Norwegian Salmon on the menu at Equinox? No way! No more Beluga caviar washed down with Bombay Gin, you've got to be kidding me.

                OK, really seriously this time. We produce enough to feed our country and DO also export the rest. If you embargo imports, you also create retaliatory embargoes against your own exports--and, there would be some very unhappy midwestern farmers and western ranchers that would be quite dismayed at that.

                Nope, the world is different, and we do need international standards, regulations, restrictions, controls, inspections, and labeling of food, and now, I think also, feed for animals. I really need to know that my Norwegian Salmon is not mercury tainted, and that my Beluga caviar is not merely carp eggs, and my Bombay gin is not merely grain alcohol flavored with juniper berries.

                Comment


                • #9
                  CODEX is doing a necessary job. The problem with CODEX is that people who don't believe in their mission are in charge. That's pretty damn familiar to us here in America where the present administration does exactly that in every single regulatory agency. We just had an pro-pollution lobbyist put in charge of EPA. FDA is run by the food and drug companies. The Mine Safety Administration is run by Coal Industry anti-regulation lobbyist. The Forest Service is run by Timber company lobbyists. Etc all down the line.

                  But we NEED CODEX in the modern world. Just like we NEED the FDA. The necessary job is to get them work in the public interest.

                  -Mark

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Here's part of the real issue and why we need worldwide standards, inspection and enforcement.

                    China's food safety woes now a global concern
                    Pet food crisis focuses attention on frightening potential health hazards

                    The Associated Press
                    Updated: 2:40 p.m. CT April 12, 2007

                    SHANGHAI, China - The list of Chinese food exports rejected at American ports reads like a chef’s nightmare: pesticide-laden pea pods, drug-laced catfish, filthy plums and crawfish contaminated with salmonella.

                    Yet, it took a much more obscure item, contaminated wheat gluten, to focus U.S. public attention on a very real and frightening fact: China’s chronic food safety woes are now an international concern.

                    In recent weeks, scores of cats and dogs in America have died of kidney failure blamed on eating pet food containing gluten from China that was tainted with melamine, a chemical used in plastics, fertilizers and flame retardants. While humans aren’t believed at risk, the incident has sharpened concerns over China’s food exports and the limited ability of U.S. inspectors to catch problem shipments.

                    “This really shows the risks of food purity problems combining with international trade,” said Michiel Keyzer, director of the Center for World Food Studies at Amsterdam’s Vrije Universiteit.

                    Just as with manufactured goods, exports of meat, produce, and processed foods from China have soared in recent years, prompting outcries from foreign farm sectors that are feeling pinched by low Chinese prices.

                    Worried about losing access to foreign markets and stung by tainted food products scandals at home, China has in recent years tried to improve inspections, with limited success.

                    The problems the government faces are legion. Pesticides and chemical fertilizers are used in excess to boost yields while harmful antibiotics are widely administered to control disease in seafood and livestock. Rampant industrial pollution risks introducing heavy metals into the food chain.

                    Farmers have used cancer-causing industrial dye Sudan Red to boost the value of their eggs and fed an asthma medication to pigs to produce leaner meat. In a case that galvanized the public’s and government’s attention, shoddy infant formula with little or no nutritional value has been blamed for causing severe malnutrition in hundreds of babies and killing at least 12.

                    China’s Health Ministry reported almost 34,000 food-related illnesses in 2005, with spoiled food accounting for the largest number, followed by poisonous plants or animals and use of agricultural chemicals.

                    Paying the price
                    With China increasingly intertwined in global trade, Chinese exporters are paying a price for unsafe practices. Excessive antibiotic or pesticide residues have caused bans in Europe and Japan on Chinese shrimp, honey and other products. Hong Kong blocked imports of turbot last year after inspectors found traces of malachite green, a possibly cancer-causing chemical used to treat fungal infections, in some fish.

                    One source of the problem is China’s fractured farming sector, comprised of small landholdings which make regulation difficult, experts said.

                    Small farms ship to market with little documentation. Testing of the safety and purity of farm products such as milk is often haphazard, hampered by fuzzy lines of authority among regulators. Only about 6 percent of agricultural products were considered pollution-free in 2005, while safer, better quality food officially stamped as “green” accounts for just 1 percent of the total, according to figures compiled by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.


                    For foreign importers, the answer is to know your suppliers and test thoroughly, food industry experts said.

                    “You just have to hope that your system is strong enough and your producers are careful enough,” said Todd Meyer, China director for the U.S. Grains Council.

                    Health Ministry officials acknowledge problems, but have described scandals such as the 2004 baby formula deaths as isolated incidents. Neither the ministry nor the State Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine, responsible for overall food safety standards, responded to questions submitted to them in writing as requested.

                    Over the past 25 years, Chinese agricultural exports to the U.S. surged nearly 20-fold to $2.26 billion last year, led by poultry products, sausage casings, shellfish, spices and apple juice.

                    Inspectors from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are able to inspect only a tiny percentage of the millions of shipments that enter the U.S. each year.


                    Even so, shipments from China were rejected at the rate of about 200 per month this year, the largest from any country, compared to about 18 for Thailand, and 35 for Italy, also big exporters to the U.S., according to data posted on the FDA’s Web site.

                    Dangers and false labeling
                    Chinese products are bounced for containing pesticides, antibiotics and other potentially harmful chemicals, and false or incomplete labeling that sometimes omits the producer’s name.

                    To protect its foreign markets, China is trying to set up a dedicated export supply chain, sealed off from the domestic market, said Keyzer. Systems for tracking and tracing vegetables have been set up, although doing so for meat products is harder, he said.

                    Large producers targeting foreign markets have also moved to gain greater control over supplies by expanding their operations instead of buying from individual farmers.

                    The tainted pet food scandal is likely to increase this momentum. More than 100 brands of pet foods and treats have been recalled, one of the largest pet food recalls in history. Menu Foods was the first of at least six companies to recall pet food, beginning in mid-March, after reported cases of cats and dogs developing kidney failure after eating the affected products.

                    How the contaminated wheat gluten got into the product cycle is not yet known. The gluten was traced to a company outside Shanghai, Xuzhou Anying Biologic Technology Development Co.

                    The company and the government’s inspection and quarantine administration are investigating. But a company sales manager, Geng Xiujuan, said Xuzhou Anying was only a middleman, buying the gluten, commonly used as a thickener in pet food, from companies in neighboring provinces and selling it to a separate trading company.


                    While no investigation results have been announced, industry experts said they suspect the gluten might have been contaminated by having been processed or stored in machines or containers also used for melamine. Such anomalies show just how difficult it is to ensure purity, they said.

                    “It’s just really hard to test for everything,” Meyer said.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      "Here's part of the real issue and why we need worldwide standards, inspection and enforcement". I agree that we do need this but how about just on imported and exported foods? If Codex goes thru we won't even be able to buy vitamin C or anything else pretaining to vitamins and minerals. This is a wolf in sheep's clothing and they are not telling you the whole story but just what they want you to hear. If they did what they said then it would help alot of people and solve alot of problems but you need to read the fine print...Cheers..NoodJuggler

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        OK, who are "they" that will prevent me from buying vitamin C that has been produced, packaged and labeled accoding to the standards of which our country is signatory?

                        Or is it that you wish for the rest of the world to live up to standards, but not us?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          FDA

                          I thought I would throw this one in, as it has to do with the FDA pushing their agenda around. Amazing how the Government is running around making, or trying to make changes, without the general publics knowledge.

                          We need to keep everyone informed as much as possible. Thanks for the links and the heads up. We have been on the path to total World Order (to include import and export rules and regulations), for a long time, and now it seems it is on track to finally take hold. We, America, must now drop our standards so that the rest of the world's nations can compete in the open markets.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            A LESSON IN WHERE TO STOP..............

                            A mouse looked through the crack in the wall to see the farmer and his wife open a package. What food might this contain?" The mouse wondered - he was devastated to discover it was a mousetrap.

                            Retreating to the farmyard, the mouse proclaimed the warning: There is a mousetrap in the house! There is a mousetrap in the house!"

                            The chicken clucked and scratched, raised her head and said, "Mr.Mouse, I can tell this is a grave concern to you, but it is of no consequence to me.I cannot be bothered by it."

                            The mouse turned to the pig and told him, "There is a mousetrap in the house! There is a mousetrap in the house!"

                            The pig sympathized, but said, I am so very sorry, Mr.Mouse, but there is nothing I can do about it but pray.

                            Be assured you are in my prayers." The mouse turned to the cow and said "There is a mousetrap in the ho use!There is a mousetrap in the house!"

                            The cow said, "Wow, Mr. Mouse. I'm sorry for you, but it's no skin off my nose."

                            So, the mouse returned to the house, head down and dejected, to face the farmer's mousetrap alone.

                            That very night a sound was heard throughout the house -- like the sound of a mousetrap catching its prey. The farmer's wife rushed to see what was caught. In the darkness, she did not see it was a venomous snake whose tail the trap had caught.

                            The snake bit the farmer's wife. The farmer rushed her to the hospital , and she returned home with a fever.

                            Everyone knows you treat a fever with fresh chicken soup, so the farmer took his hatchet to the farmyard for the soup's main ingredient.

                            But his wife's sickness continued, so friends and neighbors came to sit with her around the clock.

                            To feed them, the farmer butchered the pig.

                            The farmer's wife did not get well; she died.

                            So many people came for her funeral, the farmer had the cow slaughtered to provide enough meat for all of them.

                            The mouse looked upon it all from his crack in the wall with great sadness.

                            So, the next time you hear someone is facing a problem and think it doesn't concern you, remember -- when one of us is threatened, we are all at risk.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              quote:
                              Originally posted by Naturist Mark:
                              CODEX is doing a necessary job. The problem with CODEX is that people who don't believe in their mission are in charge. That's pretty damn familiar to us here in America where the present administration does exactly that in every single regulatory agency. We just had an pro-pollution lobbyist put in charge of EPA. FDA is run by the food and drug companies. The Mine Safety Administration is run by Coal Industry anti-regulation lobbyist. The Forest Service is run by Timber company lobbyists. Etc all down the line.

                              ...

                              -Mark


                              You mean like Bush today appointing, to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, a fellow who has worked again and again to DECREASE product safety:
                              http://www.consumersunion.org/pub/co...ty/004428.html

                              Comment

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