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Neat site for steam automobiles

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  • a1922stanley
    replied
    How does a Stanley work? A very good site on the workings of these wonderful cars...
    http://www.stanleymotorcarriage.com/

    Leave a comment:


  • a1922stanley
    replied
    The land speed racer was in existance for just a little over a year. After it broke the speed rechord in 1906, it was brought back to the factory for some improvements. The cylinders were bored larger and new pistons were installed with out any rings. The engine to the car is now in the Smithonian Institute. I know the throttle is also in existance but I do not know where it is. Fred Marriot kept the throttle until he passed away. You may also try the Stanley Museum for any pictures of the land speed rechord car. I know there are 4 photographs of it in existance, one with F.E. Stanley in the driver seat, one with fred Marriot in the driver seat, one under steam and driveing on the beach, and one of it in a tangeled wreck.

    CWR

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  • LakeSuperiorNude
    replied
    I found some small photos of the speed record Stanley at this site.

    http://www.birthplaceofspeed2003.com/steamers.htm

    Apparently there are not many photos of this vehicle. It was nearly a hundred years ago.

    A1922Stanley, Thanks for bringing up this topic!

    Leave a comment:


  • fred950
    replied
    quote:
    Originally posted by LakeSuperiorNude:
    [qb] Thanks for the website. I am a classic car fan and enjoyed the link.

    I did a quick look through the site but did not see a photo of the 1906 Stanley Steamer that set the then world speed record of 127 mph. Would anybody know where to find a photo of this vehicle? It has been reported to have a body that is a boat turned upside down with a cut out for the cockpit, but built by Stanley Steamer. I have done numerous web searches with no luck at finding any photos of this vehicle. [/qb]
    Try the current issue of Special Interest Autos.

    Leave a comment:


  • a1922stanley
    replied
    In the United States alone there were over 120 different manufactures of steam automobiles. Some had a long life like Stanley, White, Lane and Doble. Others only saw one or two years of existance, like Gearless, Scotts Newcomber and Skeene.
    Of all the makes, White produced the most cars in a 10 year span (1900-1910)some 15,000 cars. Stanley in a 30 year range (1897-1927) produced around 12,000 cars. Today Stanley out numbers White is survivors 4 to 1. White being built with steel frames and lots of brass and steel were scrapped during WW1 and WW2. Stanley had a wood frame up to 1914 and were more prone to survive.
    About 10% of all the makes have at least one example in existance.

    Leave a comment:


  • nudeM
    replied
    a1922stanley: I sent you a PM concerning your steamer. As I stated, we "a military veterans organization" have a 1924 Chevrolet, even though it is not a steamer. I just had to send you a message from the photo in your profile. The looks are similar, the colors are the same, green.

    I checked out your link, and must admit, it is a very good link. Thanks for sharing.

    Leave a comment:


  • NuTex
    replied
    Welcome a1922Stanley!

    I love classic cars also. And I'm very much interested in history from the period of 1890's to circa 1950. So your site was right up my alley.

    I wasn't aware that they made steam powered cars as late as they did.

    Thanks for the great link.
    NuTex

    Leave a comment:


  • a1922stanley
    replied
    Stanley had a canoe company make the body for the 1906 land speed racer that reached 127 m.p.h. The car was distroyed in 1907 when it became airborne doing an estimated 200 m.p.h. The car did not complete the required distance for the record and thus was not offical. The driver Fred Marriot survived the crash, and with the crash ended Stanley's entrance into raceing. F.E. Stanley was killed in 1918 roing over 60 m.p.h. in a special car he had built for himself.
    There is one replica of the Stanley speed racer that I know of, and has a 10 h.p. engine in it instead of a 30 h.p. The Stanley Museum may have some copies of the car.

    Leave a comment:


  • LakeSuperiorNude
    replied
    Thanks for the website. I am a classic car fan and enjoyed the link.

    I did a quick look through the site but did not see a photo of the 1906 Stanley Steamer that set the then world speed record of 127 mph. Would anybody know where to find a photo of this vehicle? It has been reported to have a body that is a boat turned upside down with a cut out for the cockpit, but built by Stanley Steamer. I have done numerous web searches with no luck at finding any photos of this vehicle.

    Leave a comment:


  • missouriboy
    replied
    I love antique cars, and I'm a steamfan too (mostly railroad, but those Stanleys are great also).

    Good website, thanks for posting it. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

    Leave a comment:


  • hw
    replied
    Welcome to the INA forums a1922Stanley... oh man we need to shorten that name...how about 22Stan? (A-1-S sounds too much like steak sauce). lol I always shorten names, just ask Moboy.

    That is a great site, the cars look just wonderful. I think it may be of interest to Fred950 and barelybob...any others?

    Again welcome...and Happy Nude Year! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]

    Leave a comment:


  • a1922stanley
    replied
    I thought that everyone would enjoy this site of antique steam automobiles, (mostly Stanley's) www.stanleysteamers.com

    Leave a comment:


  • a1922stanley
    started a topic Neat site for steam automobiles

    Neat site for steam automobiles

    I thought that everyone would enjoy this site of antique steam automobiles, (mostly Stanley's) www.stanleysteamers.com
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