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  • Developing film?

    Sorry if this should be an FAQ.

    I used to have the address of a mail-in shop listed as a nudist/naturist friendly film developer, and since then have heard stories about NOT taking any such film to W*mart.

    Any recommendation for film developing?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Sorry if this should be an FAQ.

    I used to have the address of a mail-in shop listed as a nudist/naturist friendly film developer, and since then have heard stories about NOT taking any such film to W*mart.

    Any recommendation for film developing?

    Thanks!

    Comment


    • #3
      I used to have very good luck with a company that was Seattle Film Works. They changed their name and are now online at Photoworks.com. I have always been pleased with their quality and service.

      I say "used to" because I haven't used them in a long while due to the purchase of a digital camera. Last time I did, though, which was maybe a year or two ago, things were fine.

      If any pics are family and include children, you may want to really think about getting a digital or a Polaroid.

      Either way, you may wish to contact Photoworks before sending anything in.

      Good luck!

      Comment


      • #4
        you could develop the film your self but the equipment runs close to a grand for everything you need.

        Comment


        • #5
          I still use my 35mm camera. I just take my film

          to my local CVS drug store to be developed. I

          just tell the person working in the film area

          there will be some nudity on my pictures so

          that if they have a problem with it they can

          say so before I leave them. I have never had a

          problem, and the workers tell me they enjoy

          seeing the pictures from Maui, Orient Beach,

          or some other tropical beach location.

          Comment


          • #6
            I found a developer online a couple years agao & shipped off some old 35 mm film, which they burnt onto a CD for me. However the company is no longer accepting orders.

            Unfortunately I couldn't find any "nudist" developers on a quick Google search. This might be a business opportunity for one of us. Of course you would have to have clear policies to avoid ethical and legal issues.

            I wouldn't trust local chain store developers. You never know what's going to happen (or not happen). I have had at least one experience where nude frames were not developed.

            Comment


            • #7
              I always go to a small family owned bussiness, never had a problem.

              Comment


              • #8
                i have found that walmart will no longer develop ANY nude picture (one-hour, or out-lab.) however, sam's club will gladly develop them in their one-hour-lab. i have talked to them about this, and they would rather not know there is nudity in advance, and say they rarely even look at developed film. they are all about volume, and let the computer do the "visuals". however... many times the ladies that work the department are very friendly after my pictures have been developed. oh... and i only use a disposable 35mm...no risk of loss or damage while hiking, rock climbing, etc.quality is excellent...go figure.

                Comment


                • #9
                  The digital camera and film era has taken its toll on consumer film, negative, and transparency processing services, prices, and availability.

                  The AANR Bulletin classifieds use to have one or two small company processors for nudist only [no adult] that advertised monthly, but not to be found in the December or January 2007 publications.

                  If they are not processing anymore the demand doesn't justify providing the service.

                  I also noticed some major slide and film mail-in processors have notices of stopping their own E6/E41 processing and require an additional two week waiting period to forward on to labs that still have the service. It will soon be too prohibitive in cost to justify regular camera film and camera use and processing over the digital almost instant processing printing, and burning of high resolution images onto CD's and DVD's for archival purposes.

                  It also would be a good idea for everyone to archive old slide and transparency collections of old or family pictures so what you have will not deteriorate any further once put into the digital or optical format electronically.

                  I invested in a high resolution film and negative scanner, and a flat bed scanner to archive old photos that are irreplaceable.

                  It’s also a good idea to store Back Up optical copies at another location in case of a fire, water damage or flood.

                  .

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    NakedGary makes some good points. I want to provide some advice for older photos that want to be saved.

                    The Georgia Secretary of State's Office has what is called the Vanishing Georgia Project and The Georgia Historical Society works with it also. You can often bring in older photos, film, and even cassette tapes and they will copy them to other media for preservation purposes as long as you let them keep copies if they want.

                    Other states may have similar options. If so, this can enable you to save older photos before they are no longer viable.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      quote:
                      I invested in a high resolution film and negative scanner, and a flat bed scanner to archive old photos that are irreplaceable.


                      If you can scan the negatives, why not just develop your own film?

                      Re archiving: properly stored film may still be the best way to preserve old photos. Digital standards change rapidly - even if your CDR or DVR's retain all their info over the decades, you may not have a machine to read them. How many of you have computers that can read an 8 inch floppy disk? Or 5 inch disk, even the once ubiquitous 3.5 inch disk?

                      -Mark

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                      • #12
                        Thanks for the informative and updated information!

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