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How do you find out your local laws?

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  • How do you find out your local laws?

    Other than the hard way via a knock on the door from the police?

    I have doone a few searches at the Georgia.gov site to see what I can find, and have come up lacking any definite answers.

  • #2
    Other than the hard way via a knock on the door from the police?

    I have doone a few searches at the Georgia.gov site to see what I can find, and have come up lacking any definite answers.

    Comment


    • #3
      You basically need to be concerned about three levels of laws/ordinances: state, county/parish, and municipality.

      A fairly good compendium of state laws can be found at http://www.nac.oshkosh.net/StatesPro...es/states.html

      The states that I am most familiar with do not allow counties to enact ordinances governing human behavior (other than burn bans, etc) so I have not had a problem with those. This means that if I am outside a municipality I need only worry about the state laws. You should certainly make sure whether or not this also applies to your state before accepting it on principle.

      Municipal ordinances may be harder to find but can at least be found closer to home. Look for ordinances concerning "public nuisance", "indecent exposure", "obscenity", etc. Also note that some states, such as New Jersey, allow municipalities to regulate/prohibit certain types of behavior on state owned/leased/contracted lands within their boundaries. Thus, a NJ state beach that lies within a municipality may be subject to municipal regulation in addition to that of the state.

      Comment


      • #4
        From the way Georgia SB5 reads [from the NAC link], unless you pre notify by posting a page prior to the receipent seeing the nudity or sexually explicit content:

        Georgia - SB5 Offical Code of Georgia

        2003 LEGISLATIVE SESSION

        Georgia Senate Bill 5

        | Bill history | NAC's 2003 Bill Text Archive | Legislative Bill Texts | NAC Main Page |


        03 LC 22 4939


        Senate Bill 5
        By: Senator Harp of the 16th


        A BILL TO BE ENTITLED
        AN ACT

        To amend Code Section 16-12-81 of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated, relating to the offense of distributing material depicting nudity or sexual content, so as to make such offense apply expressly to electronic mail and other electronic or computer media; to provide a notice; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes.


        BE IT ENACTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF GEORGIA:

        SECTION 1.

        Code Section 16-12-81 of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated, relating to the offense of distributing material depicting nudity or sexual content, is amended by inserting a new subsection to be designated subsection (d) to read as follows:
        "(d) A person commits the offense of distributing material depicting nudity or sexual conduct when he or she sends unsolicited by electronic mail or otherwise by electronic or computer media any material depicting nudity or sexual conduct to any person, residence, or place of employment unless there is displayed in a manner visible to the recipient before the material depicting nudity or sexual conduct becomes visible a statement identical or substantially similar to the following notice:
        'The material contained herein depicts nudity or sexual conduct. If the viewing of such material could be offensive to the recipient, the recipient is advised to delete or otherwise destroy such material.'"

        SECTION 2.

        All laws and parts of laws in conflict with this Act are repealed.'

        __________________________________________________ __________________________________

        So unless someone can find otherwise, All of you from the State of Georgia that have sent nude pictures to anyone, or CFF/CFI have broken the law.

        .

        Comment


        • #5
          Gary:"So unless someone can find otherwise, All of you from the State of Georgia that have sent nude pictures to anyone, or CFF/CFI have broken the law."

          I think the key terms and phrases here are unsolicited and displayed in a manner visible to the recipient before the material depicting nudity or sexual conduct becomes visible.

          If someone from GA wants to send their pic here, they may still do so. All they have to do is put in the subject: My nude photo. We openly state that we accept pictures so it cannot be considered unsolicited and seeing how we are going to expect nudity in pictures anyway...

          As for personal correspondences, as long as the people talking have an understanding that a future picture may contain nudity or state within the beginning that a pic will contain nudity, they are in compliance with the law.

          The law is meant to prevent X-rated spam going into people's inboxes without their prior knowledge.

          Bob S.

          Comment


          • #6
            As the NAC recommended, the State of Georgia did not make the fundamental distinction between nudity and sexual content in the final SB 5.

            SB 5 ostensibly applies only to unsolicited mail; it makes no allowance for honest error or inadvertence. It would require that any "material depicting nudity or sexual content" be preceded [before viewing] by a statement identical or substantially similar to the following notice:

            quote:
            'The material contained herein depicts nudity or sexual conduct. If the viewing of such material could be offensive to the recipient, the recipient is advised to delete or otherwise destroy such material'


            Bob S.

            I didn't read the SB 5 that closely. It only mentions: " to any person, residence, or place of employment" So if it was just sent to [email protected] it would be OK as SB 5 does not say "Business" only person, residence, or place of employment. Your correct on Unsolicited, CFI/CFF already approves nude content as long as it falls within the TOS.

            One would still have a problem getting that statement in the SB 5 in the Subject line [identical or substantially similar] of most or all email programs which limit the subject window length, and if the recipient has auto view enabled their going to see the content that might be offensive to them and violate the law or this passed SB 5.

            Many southern and bible belt states have poorly written laws like Arkansas that are actually unconstitutional and could be challenged if one has the time, money, and legal council to do so.

            I agree with you in short, but technically SB 5 is difficult to comply with using standard email programs used by a majority today unless you have a halt until checked or send a disclaimer that must be checked in an email program as do most web sites do in soliciting adult content on the net.

            Link - To NAC's recommendation and Georgia's SB 5.

            .

            Comment


            • #7
              I can't say what the equivalent would be in Georgia, but I've done what research I could regarding the law in Massachusetts.

              First I looked at the NAC page listing the state laws.

              Then I went to the state web pages and verified the listing there, and checked for anything else that seemed similar.

              Then I went to my local library in an ordinary suburban town and asked for any legal books they had. The librarian sent me to a reference shelf where they had the books of laws, and also a set of books listing legal decisions cross-referenced to the relevant laws, and then another set listing notable cases with commentary. I assume these are the kinds of books lawyers would use to plan how to defend (or prosecute?) a case, but I've got no way of knowing what else they might use, if there's more somewhere. When I was near a library in other towns I've checked the law books there and found the same ones. This makes me think that these are the standard books and there aren't any others.

              Anyway, what I found was that in our state the law is ancient and ambiguous--it says basically "Indecent exposure is illegal"--and there hasn't been any case that's made it into the books where anyone we'd call a naturist was prosecuted under it. Which means the way is open for such a case to occur, but I fervently hope I won't be involved.

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks for the feedback. I was trying to determine how much trouble one could get in for swimming nude in your own pool, if you had a fence up.

                Unfortunately, the laws seem too ambiguous to make a definite determination, as is the design I am sure. Keep us afraid of being arrested whenever the powers that be decide to, and they can control all of us.

                Comment


                • #9
                  [QUOTE]Originally posted by Nude_Dude_Runner:

                  Other than the hard way via a knock on the door from the police?

                  The short answer, there is no easy way.

                  Each state is independent and can make their own rules. Add to this the individual counties and cities-townships each state has, one now has a real big research project.

                  Starting with the state answer, go to the State’s web page (www.your state.gov).

                  In Michigan, the state posts on its web page what we call the Michigan Compiled Laws. Understanding them and navigating them is another issue.

                  Locally, our City does post on its web page the City Ordinances.

                  The best advice absent engaging an attorney, know exactly where you are going and then start a more targeted search.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If all else fails, you can always go to your City Hall and find out about municipal laws. For county laws, try the county courthouse. If your county and/or city has a website, they might be listed there.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The difficulty in going to city hall is that one presumably doesn't want to call attention to oneself. Otherwise. you could ask your local friendly police officer, "What are the laws on nudity around here?" And he probably doesn't know them specifically either.

                      I'm in the process of moving to a new county and would like to know this sort of information also.
                      But I have the advantage of this place being 20+ acres of woods totally screened from neighbors and almost totally from the road. When I get here, the clothes come off and lay in the driveway until the next morning. I hate having to get dressed and go to work.

                      Just got a computer set up out here and it's bedtime. Good night.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        a trip to the library/friendly librarian..but; Don't go nude.

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