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Will rising gas prices affect your naturist activities this summer?

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  • #16
    Mabye only how much gasoline is used to start the bon fire

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    • #17
      The rising gas prices will mean that my camping trips pulling my trailer will last longer than in the past and there will be fewer of them.

      I would like to have a new diesel pickup, but with diesel being $0.90 higher than regular gas and the diesel option costing almost $7000, I have decided to stick with a smaller truck and a trailer that it can pull.

      It is about 70 miles each way to the nudist lake near Topeka, so the cost for an afternoon in the sun has gotten real costly. It would take almost $30 in gas round trip and a $20 admission fee. I will still do it, but not very many times.
      Last edited by MJ_KC; 04-13-2008, 09:25 AM.

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      • #18
        Yes, the impact of much higher gas prices has effected me and my family as well as friends and other family members. We are now watching our driving habits and for what reasons. We also consolidate trips when doing grocery shopping, for example, and carpool so that only one vehicle makes the trip to the grocery store, the drug store, or other shopping places.

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        • #19
          Sometimes I feel so sorry for all you poor americans, $4 per gallon is just way too high, try moving to the UK. More like $9 per gallon over here. Time you all started buying small japanese cars that do more than 40 miles per gallon, yes 40 MPG is achievable.
          Cheers
          Mick

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          • #20
            roaddog, I suppose you do as you pay extremely high taxes on your fuel costs. We don't. You also have better health care as a result of your higher taxes. We don't have that here. We also don't have mass transportation in most of the areas in our country. Even some of our big metropolitan areas lack good mass transportation. We don't even have a train or rail service anywhere in our metropolitan areas. We have in some cities subways, but they have limited routes.

            So, to us, $4.00 a gallon is, indeed, high!

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            • #21
              Originally posted by roaddog View Post
              Sometimes I feel so sorry for all you poor americans, $4 per gallon is just way too high, try moving to the UK. More like $9 per gallon over here. Time you all started buying small japanese cars that do more than 40 miles per gallon, yes 40 MPG is achievable.
              Cheers
              Mick
              These little cars won't do me much good when it comes time to pull my travel trailer. I just tend to limit how many miles I drive each year, so my annual fuel expense it not all that bad.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by roaddog View Post
                Sometimes I feel so sorry for all you poor americans, $4 per gallon is just way too high, try moving to the UK. More like $9 per gallon over here. Time you all started buying small japanese cars that do more than 40 miles per gallon, yes 40 MPG is achievable.
                Cheers
                Mick
                People keep bringing up the issue that European gasoline prices are much higher then in the USA. They always fail to mention that most of the price that Europeans pay for gasoline is government mandated tax. This tax pays for social services such as National Health. If people want to pay $4.00 for gasoline, then they can do that, but they must be prepared to give up many of the social services and find ways to pay for those services themselves. Social services are not free. Someone always pays for them.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by MJ_KC View Post
                  These little cars won't do me much good when it comes time to pull my travel trailer. I just tend to limit how many miles I drive each year, so my annual fuel expense it not all that bad.
                  In the UK, those little cars pull little caravan trailers which are much smaller then the trailers that we have here in the USA.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Sanslines View Post
                    In the UK, those little cars pull little caravan trailers which are much smaller then the trailers that we have here in the USA.
                    My trailer is a pop-up, but it still weighs almost 3500 pounds. I want to get something that doesn't require as much setup and tear down time, but that is within the limits of my truck. I have found what I want, but it will probably be next year before I get it.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Sanslines View Post
                      Social services are not free. Someone always pays for them.
                      In the end you still have to pay the money and if you added up what we spend on fuel for our vehicles and for our medical care, the cost is more than likely higher than what is being paid in the UK and Europe.

                      I am constantly amazed at how many high-tech machines there are all over the hospital that I go to. They needed to move the cancer center out of the hospital to free up some room, so it was moved down the road a couple of miles.

                      They purchased several new CT scanners for the cancer center instead of sending us to the radiology department at the hospital. I would bet that we have way more scanners of all types on a per capita basis. A national system would be bound to restrict how many of these machines could be purchased in order to contain costs. Our hospitals simply find more reasons to run scans that have to be paid for.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by roaddog View Post
                        Time you all started buying small japanese cars that do more than 40 miles per gallon. Mick
                        Hi Mick.

                        The problem with those little wimpy cars is that they can't go anywhere not covered in pavement!

                        I would rather have a vehicle that gets half the mileage, but capable of climbing a rock wall or even a tree, and that can carry all of my gear plus wife and dogs!

                        All in fun!!

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                        • #27
                          Exerpt from The National Interest - Where the nation's interests are taken to heart.

                          At “Oil Prices, Oil Peaks, and the Gulf Crisis”, a roundtable sponsored by The Nixon Center yesterday, three experts discussed the future of global oil markets, their implications for the United States and the current geopolitical situation in the Gulf. The panelists—all of PFC Energy, a leading industry consulting firm—included its Chairman and Founder J. Robinson West, the Manager of Market Intelligence Services David Kirsch and the Senior Director of Markets and Country Strategies Group Raad Alkadiri. Geoffrey Kemp, director of regional strategic programs at The Nixon Center, served as moderator.


                          ..........Asked about possible solutions for averting crisis in the question and answer session, West responded he only sees politicians who “haven’t a clue” searching for “pain-free solutions”—and thus looking for ways to increase supply. He criticized current alternative energy research programs as wasteful. Ethanol’s inefficiency, he said, made it more of a “vast agricultural subsidy program” than a genuine energy policy.

                          The other option is to reduce demand, West said, “but that involves pain”—and the United States has failed in this respect as well. The size of cars, for example, has only grown in recent years. This led West to make a sobering prediction: Only the “massive economic dislocation” caused by an oil shortage will induce American leaders to find alternatives to petroleum and make the tough choices necessary to curb demand.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Sanslines View Post
                            Exerpt from The National Interest - Where the nation's interests are taken to heart.

                            The other option is to reduce demand, West said, “but that involves pain”—and the United States has failed in this respect as well. The size of cars, for example, has only grown in recent years. This led West to make a sobering prediction: Only the “massive economic dislocation” caused by an oil shortage will induce American leaders to find alternatives to petroleum and make the tough choices necessary to curb demand.
                            Oil use is driven by the individual willingness to pay the price for what they want to use. The larger vehicle sizes and engines and the fact that they are being sold is an indication that many people want these vehicles. I have a 2004 Ford F-150 4x4 truck that weighs about 5000 pounds and gets lousy gas mileage around town because it takes a lot of gas to get this thing moving from a stop light. Even with that, gas prices are not even slightly close to a level that would make me sell it.

                            The politicians know that they can't make some arbitrary decisions that would increase fuel prices to extreme levels all of the sudden and make these large vehicles suddenly worthless for trade-in. People have spent a lot of money on many of these vehicles and simply would not be able to afford to buy a high mpg car if that was what was forced on us.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by MJ_KC View Post
                              Oil use is driven by the individual willingness to pay the price for what they want to use. The larger vehicle sizes and engines and the fact that they are being sold is an indication that many people want these vehicles. I have a 2004 Ford F-150 4x4 truck that weighs about 5000 pounds and gets lousy gas mileage around town because it takes a lot of gas to get this thing moving from a stop light. Even with that, gas prices are not even slightly close to a level that would make me sell it.

                              The politicians know that they can't make some arbitrary decisions that would increase fuel prices to extreme levels all of the sudden and make these large vehicles suddenly worthless for trade-in. People have spent a lot of money on many of these vehicles and simply would not be able to afford to buy a high mpg car if that was what was forced on us.
                              Very True. Many people do not want to purchase high mileage vehicles for a variety of reasons. Some think that 'those tiny tin boxes are for sisies'. Many people blame the government or the vehicle manufacturers for producing low mileage vehicles. However, in a consumer driven market, it is ultimately up to consumers to demand and purchase higher mileage vehicles.

                              Also using a pickup truck as it was intended ie to haul 'things' or to tow 'things' is fine. However, I am surrounded by loads of guys who drive solo in their pickup trucks hauling absolutely nothing and then do nothing but complain about the cost of filling up those monstrosities.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Sanslines View Post
                                Also using a pickup truck as it was intended ie to haul 'things' or to tow 'things' is fine. However, I am surrounded by loads of guys who drive solo in their pickup trucks hauling absolutely nothing and then do nothing but complain about the cost of filling up those monstrosities.
                                I can always park my truck and drive my Corvette when the weather is OK. It gets about 5 mpg better than the truck. I do drive the truck a lot with just me in it, but sometimes the bed of the truck is loaded to the top of the bed with gardening supplies and in the summer it gets to do its fair share of trailer towing. Just because you see someone driving solo in an unloaded truck, doesn't mean that this is all it is used for.

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