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Ebenezer Scrooge's Conversion

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  • Ebenezer Scrooge's Conversion

    Regarding Charles Dicken's religious ideas.

    http://www.uuworld.org/ideas/article...on2273.shtml?n

    CONVERSION

    In A Christmas Carol, without once mentioning Jesus, Dickens shows it is possible to experience a conversion--not necessarily based on a specific religious experience--but a personal regeneration that leads one to help others. With Scrooge’s transformative change of heart, Dickens illustrates that his readers, too, can be converted from a harsh, complacent, selfish worldview to one of love, hope, and charity and, like Scrooge, can again become part of the human community. For Dickens, that was the true meaning of Christmas.

  • #2
    Regarding Charles Dicken's religious ideas.

    http://www.uuworld.org/ideas/article...on2273.shtml?n

    CONVERSION

    In A Christmas Carol, without once mentioning Jesus, Dickens shows it is possible to experience a conversion--not necessarily based on a specific religious experience--but a personal regeneration that leads one to help others. With Scrooge’s transformative change of heart, Dickens illustrates that his readers, too, can be converted from a harsh, complacent, selfish worldview to one of love, hope, and charity and, like Scrooge, can again become part of the human community. For Dickens, that was the true meaning of Christmas.

    Comment


    • #3
      This is a valuable point, and well stated. The article is interesting too. The Unitarians have every right to claim Dickens as part of their heritage, though I suspect that—-as is true of all churches--the Unitarian churches of today are a lot different from the ones that Dickens encountered.

      We would benefit greatly from a revival of the Classic Liberalism that Dickens illustrates. What passes as liberalism today is thin soup compared to the classic variety.

      Much of the impetus for Classic Liberalism, though by no means all of it, came from great church leaders whose compassion for humanity led them to realize that evangelism (care of souls) should never be separated from social concern (care of bodies). In the US this led to such steps forward as the abolishment of child labor and the end of sweatshops.

      Unfortunately in the US today there are few influential churches who manage to keep "care of souls" and "care of bodies" on equal footing with each other. Most churches focus either on social issues or on evangelism, to the detriment of both. The major exceptions to this statement are mostly found in the great African American churches, which do find ways to keep their balance.

      Anyway, David, good point. Thanks for making it.

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      • #4
        I agree I think that A Christmas Carol is one of my favorite holiday stories. While he never goes into detail the message is clear especially at the end when little Tiny Tim declares God BLess us everyone.

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        • #5
          Touche, NudeAl.

          Comment


          • #6
            I don't know about the religious aspect of the movie, but I thought he was a nice person at the beginning. Before the ghosts started messing with his mind.

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            • #7
              quote:
              but I thought he was a nice person at the beginning. Before the ghosts started messing with his mind.

              He was a "Scrooge"!

              Comment


              • #8
                quote:
                He was a "Scrooge"!

                Yeah? And your point is?? lol

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                • #9
                  quote:
                  Originally posted by tinner666:
                  quote:
                  He was a "Scrooge"!

                  Yeah? And your point is?? lol

                  The point is;
                  "Ebenezer Scrooge was an unhappy, negative and cynical businessman preoccupied with his greedy pursuit of money, who did not want to be bothered with, did not want to participate in, and could not get into the "spirit" of Christmas. He repudiated all the folderol associated with Christmas".

                  Therefore there is a common expression, "Don't be a Scrooge", meaning "Don't have those negative attributes of a Scrooge".

                  Maybe it is admirable that you could overlook Ebenezer's negativity during the first part of the film you mentioned, as that may indicates that you would also forgive others some of their negativity in real life. Perhaps many of us need some forberance in that respect from others from time to time.

                  No "Bah, Humbug" from me.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Yes I can overlook others negativity. I even have some at times. My posts were 'tongue in cheek'.
                    This forum gets so serious at times! Lighten up! And live and let live! It's the only life and world we have.
                    I grew up with Don Rickles, ChecyChase, Edie Murphy, Pryor, Dan Akroyd, etal. as mentors.
                    If you could ever hear some of my Black Panther friends and I banter back and forth over slavery and other issues, you'd think we were gonna fight or worse.
                    I'm a lover of good-natured banter as opposed to real contention. There was some of that banter with Mike1986 on this forum somewhere, laughingly carried on when we met also.

                    No offense was meant even though I am considered a Scrooge at times.

                    Comment

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